Vision Board: 1940s Garden Party

Hi dolls!

I hope that you are enjoying these last few days of September. One thing I love about the transition from summer to autumn is that brief period of time where the warm summer sun is accompanied by a cool breeze. I walk A LOT and this is my favourite time of year to explore the parks around my neighbourhood and exploit the end of the National Trust season with visits to stately homes. In honour of this gorgeous season, I’ve been working hard on my Objet d’Art dress from Decades of Style. It’s the perfect accompaniment to a relaxed autumn, totally equipped for a turn in the weather by throwing on some tights and a cardigan.

As with my other makes, I’ve worked hard to picture exactly how the Objet d’Art dress can be worn. In picking out fabric for any of my makes, I’m always aware of the various vintage accessories that might really draw out the era while also tailoring the garment to whichever setting I’m picturing for it. When I saw the Objet d’Art dress, my mind turned immediately to garden parties, hosted in that transitional summer to autumn period. It’s a dress for lounging, tennis playing on the lawn, and taking a leisurely walk.

For my reference, I usually create something of a ‘vision board’ that I work from in deciding on fabrics and accessories. To take Sew for Victory from simply documenting the beginning and end of projects, I’ve decided to introduce these vision boards to my posts here. Hopefully this will provide a point of inspiration for those of you looking to create a complete vintage look. So, without further ado, my 1940s Garden Party Vision Board:

1940sGardenParty.png

 

Pattern: Objet d’Art dress from Decades of Style

Fabric: Blue, Navy and White Striped Shirting from The Splendid Stitch

Shoes: Light Brown Brogues from New Look

Gloves: White Shirred Gloves from JewelryAndThings2 (Etsy)

Bag: 1940s Floral Purse from SL Vintage (Etsy)

Necklace: White Freshwater Pearl Necklace from Pearl Distributors

The stepping-off point for this board was the Objet d’Art pattern from Decades of Style. Although listed on the website as a 1950s pattern, it screams late-’40s style to me (particularly in the silhouette and the accessories that I picture it with). In that 1940s garden party setting, white dress gloves and a string of pearls are sophisticated accents. Pair with a simple, embroidered handbag to celebrate being out in nature and cling on to the remnants of summer. And finally, recognise the importance of practically – as well as the dominance of low-heeled pumps in the 1940s period – by popping on a pair of tan brogues. All of these bits and pieces are incredibly accessible and can be bought on the high street if you want to avoid paying for genuine vintage items (you might, for instance, want to steer away from paying $150 for a real pearl necklace, however gorgeous).

My version of the Objet d’Art dress is almost ready to go. I can’t wait to share it with you and, in the meantime, maybe this will give you a few ideas for building up your own vintage wardrobe!

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Learning From Vintage Fashion Illustrations

Hello lovelies!

Over the past couple of weeks, I’ve been dipping in and out of the various vintage magazines that I’ve collected since I started sewing. I love these magazines for the insight they give into daily life of bygone eras and the general concerns of women that lived through these decades. But there are also so many great tips related to sewing, knitting, and crafting your own fashionable garments by hand.

Since my era of choice is the 1930s-1940s, most of my magazines and vintage fashion manuals date from that period. One of my favourite things to peruse when I’m looking for inspiration are the great fashion illustrations that populate regular style features. Since a lot of you email and comment about the general lack of non-contemporary vintage inspiration, I thought that it would be useful to post about a few of my favourite genuinely vintage fashion pictures from the 1940s.

Both of these images come from an issue of Woman’s Illustrated published on 1st April 1944 and show some great ideas for detailing on day dresses. The two dresses on the left offer fantastic examples of small additions used to turn relatively simple garments into unique pieces of 1940s fashion. C20,161 is – according to author of the feature, Sarah Redwood – a dress where “the lines of frilling and the front gathered skirt are responsible for quite seventy percent of its charm.” C20,293 offers fabric ruffles attached to the neckline and demands being made in a printed fabric. With my favourite line from the whole feature, Sarah Redwood suggests that: “Like the first swallow, the first printed crepes make one feel happy at the thought of summer just around the corner.” I have to agree with Sarah on that one, although I’m all about recapturing that summer feeling by wearing bright prints year round.

In the right-hand image, we have some great examples of how effectively gathering can be used to capture that vintage style. Both C20,635 and C20,519 use gathers at the neckline to really great effect. This isn’t something that I’ve come across in any vintage reproduction patterns but with some small modifications to the neckline of contemporary patterns could be pretty easily added in. I especially love the scalloped neckline on C20,519 – so gorgeous.

These two illustrations are taken from separate 1944 issues of Woman’s Illustrated and are particularly great for showing the importance of the wrap-style dress to mid-1940s era fashion. These are good examples of evening dresses, particularly when combined with the suggested accessories. I’m not sure bows have truly made their comeback yet but who knows? Perhaps we can be pioneers of the trend. Of CM20,777, on the right, Sarah Redwood says: “The frock that answers a thousand and one different calls is a treasure indeed, and that is the claim we make for this dress. It is a nicely balanced mixture of extreme elegance and extreme ease, comfortable, smart, and undating.” The fact that this dress could be worn pretty inconspicuously today pretty much proves her point.

image

My final favourite fashion illustration has to be this one. I adore the shirt dress in particular. And since I have Sew Over It’s Vintage Shirt Dress in line for an upcoming project, its good to see that this contemporary pattern effectively captures a classic style. I also love the neckline of C20,215. Paired with a sparkly vintage brooch, it would be an easy vintage standout.

Hopefully this short journey through some of my favourite 1940s fashion illustrations has given you some food for thought. Perhaps the shape of the garments inspires you, or maybe the pictured accessories and fabric ideas feed your imagination.These gorgeous pictures always help me when I’m trying to get out of a sewing rut or otherwise plan some unique touches to patterns I’m working on. And if these few pictures aren’t enough, I’ll be making sure to write more vintage inspiration posts in the future. So stay tuned!

Inspire A Style: Jacqueline’s Tea Room

Welcome to (almost) autumn!

I’m very excited that we’re now in September. As much as summer is a great opportunity to get out and about in the world, nothing beats the feeling of cool autumn weather and the chance to cosy up with a book (or sewing machine) and cup of tea. Autumn is absolutely my favourite time of year and I can’t wait for when it gets cold enough that pressing my fabric no longer gives me heat exhaustion.

Since I’m celebrating the on-coming autumn, I thought I would share one of my favourite places to wile away autumn afternoons and gather some inspiration for my next sewing project: Jacqueline’s Tea Room!

Who?

Those of you familiar with Colchester will know that it’s a pretty stereotypical English town: streets filled with shoppers and chain stores everywhere. Fortunately, its history (Colchester is the oldest recorded town in Britain) means that it’s a place full of hidden gems. There’s a great castle, fantastic park, and some beautiful buildings. But one of my favourite jewels at the heart of an otherwise pretty stereotypical British town is Jacqueline’s – a fabulous 1940s tea room with enough authenticity to make you feel as though you’ve stepped back in time.

I actually stumbled on Jacqueline’s when I was out on a trek with my fiancé, shortly after we moved to Colchester. I was feeling pretty miserable after upping sticks from a gorgeous countryside village to be nearer to my university. I was missing the fields and the peace and quiet and, without a car to get around, we were pretty restricted to visiting places that were within walking distance. When we found Jacqueline’s, it felt a lot like coming home. It’s set up to give a truly authentic ’40s vibe, not to mention an incredible selection of teas and cakes. Beyond that, it has given me a huge amount of inspiration when it comes to my sewing expeditions.

Why?

As long-time readers of Sew for Victory will know, my Inspire A Style posts are usually restricted to people. But places can often be just as inspiring when it comes to thinking about sewing projects. Soaking up the ’40s ambiance always places me in a different headspace – listening to period music while surrounded by decor that gives off the era always gets my mind churning over fabrics and patterns.

I would highly suggest that if you find yourself stuck in a sewing rut, you get yourself out into some inspiring places. You’ll spot people, colours, and designs that trigger a lightbulb moment. Or you’ll find yourself reminded of films you’ve seen and books you’ve read that similarly inspire you.  Visiting Jacqueline’s has given me back my motivation on numerous occasions, so trust me and give it a go!

What?

So quite how has this perfect little tea room inspired my sewing? There are so many projects that have drawn their inspiration, in one way or another, from my trips for tea and cake. All my ‘home style’ 1940s creations feel as though they wouldn’t be out of place in this setting. Both my Great British Sewing Bee Vintage Blouse and my recent Big Vintage Sew-along make suggest the kind of atmosphere you find at Jacqueline’s. Jacqueline’s was also the direct inspiration for my version of Sew Over It’s Joan dress, which I made for a special Valentine’s High Tea with my gorgeous boy!

 

And there are so many patterns that I have rolling around my mind that draw on the war-time sitting room feel that I soak up every time I step through the doors. The B4790 Walkaway dress would be an easy way to achieve that ’40s style.

B4790a

Or what about the gorgeous V1019 suit dress? So perfect! I think I might have to add this one to my list of projects.

V1019

So much sewing, so little time! But what a good position to be in.

If you end up in Colchester, definitely make some time to stop at Jacqueline’s. And don’t forget to invite me because I’m always looking for an excuse to drink more tea and think about new sewing projects!