Inspire A Style: Jacqueline’s Tea Room

Welcome to (almost) autumn!

I’m very excited that we’re now in September. As much as summer is a great opportunity to get out and about in the world, nothing beats the feeling of cool autumn weather and the chance to cosy up with a book (or sewing machine) and cup of tea. Autumn is absolutely my favourite time of year and I can’t wait for when it gets cold enough that pressing my fabric no longer gives me heat exhaustion.

Since I’m celebrating the on-coming autumn, I thought I would share one of my favourite places to wile away autumn afternoons and gather some inspiration for my next sewing project: Jacqueline’s Tea Room!

Who?

Those of you familiar with Colchester will know that it’s a pretty stereotypical English town: streets filled with shoppers and chain stores everywhere. Fortunately, its history (Colchester is the oldest recorded town in Britain) means that it’s a place full of hidden gems. There’s a great castle, fantastic park, and some beautiful buildings. But one of my favourite jewels at the heart of an otherwise pretty stereotypical British town is Jacqueline’s – a fabulous 1940s tea room with enough authenticity to make you feel as though you’ve stepped back in time.

I actually stumbled on Jacqueline’s when I was out on a trek with my fiancé, shortly after we moved to Colchester. I was feeling pretty miserable after upping sticks from a gorgeous countryside village to be nearer to my university. I was missing the fields and the peace and quiet and, without a car to get around, we were pretty restricted to visiting places that were within walking distance. When we found Jacqueline’s, it felt a lot like coming home. It’s set up to give a truly authentic ’40s vibe, not to mention an incredible selection of teas and cakes. Beyond that, it has given me a huge amount of inspiration when it comes to my sewing expeditions.

Why?

As long-time readers of Sew for Victory will know, my Inspire A Style posts are usually restricted to people. But places can often be just as inspiring when it comes to thinking about sewing projects. Soaking up the ’40s ambiance always places me in a different headspace – listening to period music while surrounded by decor that gives off the era always gets my mind churning over fabrics and patterns.

I would highly suggest that if you find yourself stuck in a sewing rut, you get yourself out into some inspiring places. You’ll spot people, colours, and designs that trigger a lightbulb moment. Or you’ll find yourself reminded of films you’ve seen and books you’ve read that similarly inspire you.  Visiting Jacqueline’s has given me back my motivation on numerous occasions, so trust me and give it a go!

What?

So quite how has this perfect little tea room inspired my sewing? There are so many projects that have drawn their inspiration, in one way or another, from my trips for tea and cake. All my ‘home style’ 1940s creations feel as though they wouldn’t be out of place in this setting. Both my Great British Sewing Bee Vintage Blouse and my recent Big Vintage Sew-along make suggest the kind of atmosphere you find at Jacqueline’s. Jacqueline’s was also the direct inspiration for my version of Sew Over It’s Joan dress, which I made for a special Valentine’s High Tea with my gorgeous boy!

 

And there are so many patterns that I have rolling around my mind that draw on the war-time sitting room feel that I soak up every time I step through the doors. The B4790 Walkaway dress would be an easy way to achieve that ’40s style.

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Or what about the gorgeous V1019 suit dress? So perfect! I think I might have to add this one to my list of projects.

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So much sewing, so little time! But what a good position to be in.

If you end up in Colchester, definitely make some time to stop at Jacqueline’s. And don’t forget to invite me because I’m always looking for an excuse to drink more tea and think about new sewing projects!

Make Your Own Shoulder Pads: Tutorial

Happy Wednesday, sweet peas!

I thought that I would take a break from working on my newest sewing projects to write up a short tutorial on how to make the queen of all retro garment features – shoulder pads! Don’t make the mistake of thinking that shoulder pads live and die with ’80s fashion. Journey back a few more decades and shoulder pads were all the rage, as evidenced by my recent Big Vintage Sew-along make. V9127 was, in fact, my first run-in with real life shoulder pads and, despite my fears that they would give me an American football player vibe, they elevated the 1930s silhouette to a totally new level of authenticity. And, believe it or not, they are so easy to make from scratch.

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I worked with a pattern provided through V9127. But after measuring up and reading through my various sewing manuals, I’ve managed to condense the process into a few simple steps that should be workable for any garment.

What You Need:

  • Cotton Batting – I got a pack of 45″ x 60″ from Sew Essential which worked perfectly.
  • Lining Material
  • Thread and an embroidery needle

1. Measure Your Seams and Make Your Pattern

The key measurement that you’ll need for this project is the length of your shoulder seam – from neck to arm hole. You’ll want to take about half an inch off of this measurement as the total width of your shoulder pad (so, if your shoulder seam is 4.5 inches, you’ll be working towards a 4 inch wide shoulder pad).

Once you have this measurement, you’ll need to construct your pattern pieces. The first thing you’ll need is a circular base – draw a circle that is twice the length of your intended shoulder pad width (so, using the measurements above, your circle would have a diameter of 8 inches, and a radius of 4 inches).

Now for the confusing bit. You will need 4 semi-circles of decreasing size, with the first the same diameter and radius as the circle you’ve already made. The next three will be 1 inch smaller in diameter (essentially taking 0.5 inches off of either side of the diameter – when we place the pieces together, you’ll see the importance) and 0.5 inch smaller in radius than the previous.

So working with the above measurements, your first (and largest) semi-circle would have an 8 inch diameter and 4 inch radius. Your next largest would have a 7 inch diameter and a 3.5 inch radius. Your next semi-circle would have a 6 inch diameter and a 3 inch radius. And your final, smallest semi-circle would have a 5 inch diameter and a 2.5 inch radius.

Ultimately, you should wind up with a set of pattern pieces that looks something like this:

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2. Cut Everything Out

Pop your pattern pieces on the cotton batting and cut out. Remember that you’ll need two of each piece, since you’ll (hopefully) be making two shoulder pads!

You’ll also need to cut out two pieces of lining fabric that you will use to cover your shoulder pad. You can use the large circular pattern piece to do this but will want to make these pieces of fabric a little bigger than the base piece. This is because the lining will need to cover the shoulder pad and be stitched down (so essentially, you need a seam allowance) – I would suggest adding about 0.5 inch total to the diameter of the circle for this purpose.

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3. Pin Your Pieces Together

This is super easy. Start with the circle as your base. And proceed to place each semi-circle along the diameter of this circle, lining them up so that they are stacked pretty centrally. You’re basically constructing a tower out of your pieces. Once pinned in place, it should look something like this:

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4. Stitch The Pieces Together

You’ll need a thickish needle and any spare thread that you have lying around. Then work your way around the outer-edge of each semi-circle, stitching it down to those underneath. You can use any kind of stitch that works for you, as long as it’s secure. I used a basic cross stitch.

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5. Fold And Cover

Now you need to fold the loose half of the circle over and place the padding on top of you lining fabric, ready for stitching.

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6. Machine Stitch The Lining Over The Padding

Fold the lining over the top of the padding and pin down. You’ll then need to stitch around the edge, keeping nice and close to the padding, using whatever seam allowance you gave yourself when cutting out the lining fabric. I would suggest doing an additional line of stitching close to the edge of the seam allowance, for extra security. You could also use a bias binding on this outer edge if you’re concerned about fraying.

The finished product should look like a cornish pasty!

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7. Insert Into Your Garment

Place the shoulder pad along your shoulder seam so that the width of the pad runs centrally along the seam. You can then hand stitch along the seam, securing the shoulder pad in place, and keeping the stitches invisible by using the ditch that already exists. It’s also a good idea to tack the corners down somewhere – this will depend upon the shape of the garment, but tacking to the armholes is a good method. It’s not the end of the world if you don’t want to do this, it’ll just mean rummaging inside your dress/jacket when you put it on so that you can get the shoulder pads in the right place.

8. Be Bold, Bright, and Very Boxy!

Wooohooo! You’re done! And now you can rock that vintage style with appropriately square shoulders. Enjoy!

Inspire a Style: Gene Kelly

Gene Bow Tie

Since starting Sew for Victory, one of the most consistent questions I get is about the origins of my love of vintage style. Obviously the word ‘vintage’ means different things to different people. For me, it’s representative of various eras – although the 1940s is where I find most of my inspiration. One thing I consistently associate with the idea of ‘vintage’ as a style and a lifestyle are the classic films that brought me to a love for these periods long past. Of all the stars in all the films, it is Gene Kelly who taught me that 1940s Hollywood isn’t something that has to remain solely on my TV.

Who?

Many of you will already be well acquainted with Gene Kelly. Born Eugene Curran Kelly in 1912, Gene was not originally destined to grace Hollywood with his incredible dancing and acting skills. He studied economics and law at university, eventually dropping out to teach dance and work as an entertainer. After a stint on the stage, it wasn’t until 1941 that Gene gained a contract with Hollywood giant MGM. His first starring role was alongside Judy Garland in For Me and My Gal. From here, he eased into a lucrative film career, perhaps best known for his roles in An American in Paris (1951) and  Singin’ In The Rain (1952).

Gene’s incredible dancing skills – putting him up alongside Fred Astaire as one of the greatest dancers in Hollywood – and his easy charm turned him into a Hollywood legend. His athleticism is absolutely clear to anyone who watches his films. As the era of Hollywood musicals faded so too did Gene’s career at the heart of the film empire. But he had firmly embedded his name in the history of 20th century film. He died in 1996, aged 83.

Gene Dance

Why?

It is obviously a little out of left-field for me to pick a man as a style inspiration. One of the clearest principles of style from the 1940s – and other ‘vintage’ periods – is an obvious distinction between genders. However, we are now firmly in an era where these restrictions do not (and should not) apply. It is always a good idea to look outside of your conventional boxes and see what you might find!

To me, Gene Kelly is totally representative of the 1940s Hollywood fashion of the male film stars. Smart and refined, this is a style that is all about clean lines, high-waisted trousers, and accessories. The use of accessories by men (tie clips, bow ties, caps) has seen something of a resurgence over recent years, albeit by a select part of the population. When we look back to the male film stars of the 1940s, it becomes clear from where this resurgence finds its inspiration.

Beyond this, what I really love about Gene Kelly’s style is the fact that – even with its refinement and elegance – there is an easy-going fun that you can’t escape. Perhaps it is partly in the attitude of the characters he plays, or the fact that he can’t go five minutes without breaking into song and dance, but this is a style of almost lazy chicness. Gene Kelly is the epitome of ‘wear the clothes, don’t let them wear you’. And that fact is sufficient to warrant him a place as a true style inspiration.

Gene Sailor On the Town

Gene Kelly in 1949 musical ‘On the Town’

What?

So where to start in replicating this style? Apart from whipping up your own tuxedo (no easy feat, I’m sure), there are a few key ways in which its possible to draw some direct inspiration from the gorgeous Gene Kelly.

One core part of Gene Kelly’s wardrobe is a blazer-style jacket. Made up in linen and paired with a waistcoat, this would be the perfect addition to any 1940s garment line-up. Burdastyle’s 01/2014 #125 blazer pattern is a wonderful example of a 1940s style blazer pattern, with a fabulous front chain fastening as an added vintage detail. If you decide to go this route, be sure to join Male Devon Sewing’s #blazerof2016 challenge and bring Gene Kelly’s fashion legacy fully into the modern age!

For waistcoats, you needn’t look further than Simplicity 4762 for a variety of options. If you have a penchant for knitting needles, you could go a step further and whip up a cashmere or wool slipover (also known as a sweater vest). Free Vintage Knitting provides a variety of vintage knitting patterns for men’s vests. Worn with a collared shirt and a pair of wide legged trousers, you really don’t get much more 1940s!

Finally, make sure to take a look at my bow tie tutorial for a quick and easy route to making up your own personalised bow ties. Bow ties are such an effective way to add that vintage style to any outfit and are definitely the fastest way to replicate Gene Kelly’s fabulous style with your own crafting skills.

Gene Flat Cap

So whether you’re searching out this style for your fella or yourself, be sure to remember that everything should be done with a light touch and a light heart. Watch Singin’ In The Rain while you sew and I guarantee that lightness won’t be far beyond your reach.

“You dance love, and you dance joy, and you dance dreams. And I know if I can make you smile by jumping over a couple of couches or running through a rainstorm, then I’ll be very glad to be a song and dance man.”

– Gene Kelly (1912 – 1996)

Paul Flato: Jeweller To The Stars

Happy May, sweet ones!

I am currently back in the US for a visit and, unsurprisingly, spent the first few days making trips to my destinations of choice. Among them was my favourite antique mall – a huge but hidden shop in the middle of an inconsequential strip mall. Were it not for the AMAZING bubble tea place a few shops down, I wouldn’t even have stumbled upon it in the first place. But thank goodness that I did! It’s been a fabulous resource for vintage magazines, old sewing patterns, and some amazing crafting manuals from the 1950s (more posts on this to come).

Most recently, I made a trip to try and hunt out a vintage compact. Being somewhat financially constrained (hello PhD lifestyle), I really can’t afford to spend much on searching out authentic accessories. But, every so often, I find a gem that even my budget can accommodate. After investigating a few different options, I found a compact that I totally fell in love with. The information alongside it wasn’t particularly generous – the vendor’s label told me only that the compact was “Flato – 1920s-1940s”. Thankfully, we live in the digital age and a quick Google search told me that I’d stumbled on a really amazing find.

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‘Flato’ refers to Paul Flato, otherwise known as the jewellery designer to the stars. Born in 1900, Flato began his career in New York, opening a small jewellery store near 5th Avenue. With a definite sense for his craft, it wasn’t long before Flato became known for his unique jewellery designs. In 1937, Flato expanded his business to Sunset Boulevard in California, and from here he capitalised on a growing relationship with Hollywood’s most famous stars. His pieces were worn by the likes of Greta Garbo, Rita Hayworth, Joan Crawford, Ginger Rogers, and Katharine Hepburn. Flato’s designs were known in particular for some fantastically unique features, including shells and scrolls, as well as their art deco style.

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Just one example of Flato’s art deco jewellery designs.

Unfortunately, this golden age didn’t last long for Flato. In 1943, he was convicted of fraud, after illegally pawning $100,000 in jewellery. This got Flato a 16 month sentence, served in Sing Sing penitentiary. The rest of his life continued to be marred by accusations of forgery and larceny, with Flato moving to Mexico in order to avoid conviction. Flato died in 1999 and, despite his unfortunate legacy of criminality, is largely remembered for his contribution to the style that dictated 1940s Hollywood glamour.

Given everything I’ve read about Flato and his designs, I feel extremely lucky to have come across a fantastic example of his weird and wacky style (particularly for a steal of $29). Just take a look at this gorgeous thing:

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I absolutely adore it. And what an opportunity it has given me to learn more about one of the key figures in 1940s fashion. No doubt this little compact will be a key feature of many vintage outfits to come!

Mrs. Marryat Advises: Part II

If you are new to Sew for Victory, you might not yet know about my deep adoration of vintage women’s magazines. Although mostly for the ads (which are SUCH an insight into the life of women from past eras), it’s also a lot about the articles. Dated as they often are, it’s pretty incredible to be reading about the concerns, hopes, and preoccupations of the women to whom these magazines presumably catered.*

Mrs. Marryat is one of the strangest, most fascinating characters that I’ve come across so far in my intellectual journey into the life of the ‘1940s woman’. Some of you long-time readers might remember that she has made an appearance on this blog once before. Mrs. Marryat was the advice columnist for Woman’s Weekly in the 1940s. And although she often comes out with the sort of advice that turns the stomach of my modern-day feminist self, sometimes I do actually learn a thing or two about 1940s etiquette. As an engaged person, this tidbit caught my eye. I thought I would share it with you to answer a concern over which I am sure you have all, at some point, lost sleep:

NOT UNLUCKY

“I am to be married shortly, and I would like your advice as to whether it is unlucky to wear jewellery on my wedding day. My lovely white dress has a square neckline, and I would like to wear a cross and chain to take off the bareness, but I have so often heard that it is unlucky for a bride to wear ornaments of this kind. – MARY.

I can set your mind at rest by assuring you that it is not in the least unlucky for a bride to wear jewellery on her wedding day. Most brides wear a necklace, a brooch, or some ornament; and nearly all brides wear their engagement ring as well on the right hand. So follow out your own wishes and wear your cross and chain, and dismiss any superstitious ideas which have no meaning at all.

Let’s hope this marriage survived, otherwise Mrs. Marryat may have a LOT to answer for…

——-

*This is by NO means a suggestion that (1) the experience of women has ever been the same across the board, or (2) that the roles often cast on women by society are correct, preferred or acceptable. In fact, I’m vehemently opposed to both of this ideas (see Sew for Victory: A History, if you want to read more about how I reconcile sewing/vintage/feminism as things that I love).

Inspire A Style: Gene Tierney

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I’m back in the UK and, while I work on finally making progress with my Joan dress, I thought I would stop in with another instalment of Inspire A Style. This time featuring Gene Tierney, one of my favourite 1940s starlets!

Who?

Gene Tierney was an American actress who starred in a number of films throughout the 1940s, and into the ’50s. Acclaimed as one of Hollywood’s greatest beauties, she acted alongside a number of the most famous stars of the time – Humphrey Bogart, Ginger Rogers, and Spencer Tracy among them. Perhaps her most acclaimed role was as Laura in the film of the same name.

Gene Tierney is also known for the ups-and-downs of her personal life. Suffering from depression and ill-health, Tierney contemplated suicide in 1957. Her journey to overcome her mental health problems – as well as the story of her career – are documented in the amazing autobiography Self Portrait (highly recommended!).

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Why?

Gene Tierney is the epitome of 1940s glamour. Hollywood starlets of the era obviously had access to some of the most glorious garments and stylists. Other than her effortless beauty, it is this style that makes Tierney such an inspiration for anyone who wants to replicate this vintage style.

In many respects, then, Gene Tierney’s position as a fashion role-model is not the product of her personal style. But it is rather a consequence of her fortunate place at the helm of Hollywood. However, she is far from a one-dimensional personality. I think that her personal battles dictated her approach to her career, and this is something that will always inevitably flow over into other areas of life – including, in my view, style. Whether as a representation of inner battles, or as a superficial cover for them, there is always a story. And Gene Tierney perhaps best represents this fact.

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What?

Gene Tierney represents a lot of what I love about 1940s glamour. There is a certain simplicity to many of her looks, a simplicity that separates this era from those that followed. Simple, well-constructed gowns were the order of the day, paired with pearls or diamonds. Throw in some gorgeous bright reds and deep greens and this is a style that pretty much anyone can replicate. Gene Tierney is also someone to look to in attempting to replicate 1940s hairstyles. Perfect curls!

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So where can a seamstress look for patterns to replicate the Gene Tierney look? My first recommendation would undoubtedly be Decades of Style’s Belle Curve dress – to me, this totally epitomises the 1940s style and works perfectly for communicating some Hollywood glamour. I sported my version over Christmas and received endless compliments!

There’s also the glorious Doris dress from Eliza M Vintage. Worn strapless, and paired with a set of pearls, it would be perfect. I’ve made up patterns from Eliza M before, and they are so well constructed and easy to follow. Definitely recommended!

Finally, get yourself a set of heated rollers, pop your hair into some soft curls, and you’ll be ready to go! Gene Tierney in the 21st century! And I’m sure, once in this look, you will find yourself closer to the courage and determination that characterises her story.

“Life is like a little message in a bottle, to be carried by the winds and the tides.”

Gene Tierney (1920-1991)

No Snow, All Sew

Sweetpeas!

Firstly, sorry for my blogging neglect this month. I’ve been away from my sewing machine, and a stream of family events have totally soaked up my December. Fortunately, things are a little calmer now that the holidays have passed – although I still have 10 days of time in the US!

That said, I’ve had a super successful Christmas sewing-wise. My family have totally embraced the hobby and have taken it upon themselves to give me gifts that would held me move forward with new projects and skills.

Books

From my fiancé’s lovely parents, I got a couple of sewing-themed books: ‘Couture Sewing Techniques’ by Claire Shaeffer (which I’m already knee-deep in) and ‘Everyday Fashions of the Forties’. The second is an amazing collection of illustrations, photos and ads from Sears Catalogues of the 1940s. Also pictured are two gorgeous vintage brooches bought for me by my mum and the photo’s background is 3m of a 1940s fabric from my parents. Needless to say, I’m insanely excited to find a pattern worthy of this material!

Knowing my love of old magazines, my fiancé got me three American magazines from the 1940s (two Woman’s Day, and one Better Homes and Gardens). He also got me a couple of old sewing manuals, providing tips on various vintage sewing techniques.

Accessories

And finally, my fiance’s parents sorted me out with some extra accessories! Pictured on the right of the photo is a tomato pincushion – I’m told this is an American staple!

So there’s no doubt that I did very well this year, and I can’t wait to get back home so that I can start putting everything to use. For now, I’m contenting myself with a stroll through the magazines and books. The collection of 1940s Sears Catalogue photos has been providing me with some extra inspiration for future makes. A few dresses have totally caught my eye:

Aren’t they divine? I just need to find some patterns that will work!

Anyway, my loves, I hope that you have all had a fabulous December, whether celebrating Christmas, another holiday, or just relishing in the winter weather. I’ll be back shortly with a few new patterns that I’ve collected, plus some insights into the domestic life of the 1940s. In the meantime, have a fabulous New Year’s celebration – I’m massively looking forward to getting to know you all even better in 2016!

Laura x

Hats

Me and Mama Clarke doing some vintage hat shopping!

My Vintage Life: 1940s Hair Roll Tutorial

Hi loves!

I have been away in PhD land for the past week and my sewing has gone sadly unattended. It is staring at me from my sewing table and making me feel extremely guilty. Fortunately, I have a free week until I fly off to the U.S. on Saturday – so fingers crossed my Joan dress will get some love and attention!

Since I don’t have much to show you in the way of sewing progress, I thought I would stop in with a little hair tutorial. So much of the vintage style is in the details and, while I like to throw in my own twists (I am OBSESSED with cowboy boots and work them in to a whole host of outfits), I do like to try to take my hair and makeup as vintage as possible. A recent mishap with some scissors – I won’t go into this here for fear that you will never trust a word I say again – left my hair drastically shorter than it was. To my delight, I discovered that the fabulously simply 1940’s roll works just as well on short hair as long. Since it’s such a quick and easy style to put together, I thought this would be a good place for us to start!

*Disclaimer: This is the first ever hair tutorial I’ve attempted. Hopefully the photos are detailed enough (thank you to my lovely fiancé for his help)! But don’t hesitate to email me if you need any elaborations!*

Step 1: Separate off a section of hair on both sides of your head. I usually follow up from behind my ear and to my parting.

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Step 2: Take the remainder of your hair and put into a ponytail. Slip the band down slightly so that the ponytail is relatively loose (this will allow you to create the little nest needed in step 3).

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Step 3: Make a little ‘nest’ in your hair.

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Step 4: Pull your ponytail up and tuck it into the nest. Depending on how much hair you have, this may take quite a bit of effort (and a bigger ‘nest’ to fit it all in).

Step 5: Secure this roll with bobby pins (how many you need will depend on the length and thickness of your hair. I have a LOT of hair, so it takes many many clips).

Step 6: Taking one of the pieces of hair at the front of your head, twist tightly and pin into your roll. Repeat with the piece of hair on the other side of your head.

Step 7: Tidy up as needed (secure any stray bits of hair). Give it a spray. And voila! Parfait!

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Super easy and super vintage. I am in love.

L x

 

My Vintage Life: The Essex Secret Vintage Fair

Happy Saturday!

I hope that you’re all having a fab weekend so far! I’ve spent my Saturday morning at the amazing Secret Vintage Fair in Colchester. Only a 15 minute walk from where I live, I was obviously extremely excited to pay a visit and see what the fair had to offer. I wasn’t disappointed. There were a whole range of vintage and vintage-inspired items – clothes, books, Christmas decorations. Clearly, I was in heaven.

I also found just about the greatest coat of all time. I’ve been debating what to do about the whole coat situation for a while now. All of my coats are hand-my-downs, a bit rat-eared, and not really fitting with my vintage-inspired wardrobe. Now that I’m sewing my own clothes, I’ve been on the look out for a coat to match (I’m not yet brave enough to even think about tailoring my own coat). Pocket Watch and Petticoats is an amazing shop, based in Ipswich, that sells vintage reproduction clothing. I’d come across them before at a vintage market, where I lucked on a gorgeous leather jacket. Lucky as I am, I found them again this morning at the Secret Vintage Fair and purchased the new love of my life…

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It is just beautiful. Plus, it has this amazing faux-fur and lace neck cuff.

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When I saw it, I melted. And fortunately, I have a very understanding fiancé!

Other key vintage purchases included some Homemaker magazines from the 1960s. I love love love trawling through these for insights into life ‘in them days’ and any tips on dressmaking (from the pre-digital sewing machine era).

Homemaker

We also found these cute-as-a-button miniature stockings, made from vintage fabric, by Laura Love (best name ever) of 13 Stitches (she also runs a teddy hospital, which is just the most adorable thing ever). The stockings will be going on the mantlepiece later today in celebration of the fact that it is ALMOST DECEMBER.

Stockings

A successful Saturday in anyone’s book. Now time for tea and a rummage through my magazines!

Have a fantastic day!

The Belle Curve Dress

Happy Friday, sweetpeas!

As promised, I’m returning with some pictures of my finished Belle Curve dress – pattern by Decades of Style. This is BY FAR the most beautiful thing I’ve made, totally a consequence of the stunning design.

Full dress

I am beyond in love with this pattern. Despite my fear of the 36 darts, it came out quite quickly and was strangely satisfying. The darts are the most unique feature of the dress but, as well as looking great, they create a beautiful figure-hugging shape. This dress sits perfectly on my hips and I found that it achieves a fabulous hourglass shape really effortlessly.

Dress Side

I made this up in a green chiffon-poly that I bought super cheap from Walthamstow market. Since my plan is to wear this as my Christmas day dress, I thought that the forest green would work as a beautiful colour! I also thought that the shimmer to the fabric would give it that gorgeous 1940s feel.

The only change I made was to the back by introducing a V-shape to the neckline. Partly this was because I felt that it would step up the glamour factor, but it also eliminated a bit of bagginess in the upper part of the back. Basically, it streamlined the shape.

Dress Back2

There is nothing that I don’t adore about this dress. It is the most accurate 1940s-inspired pattern that I’ve found to date and it just has that WOW factor. I’ll be making this up again, without a doubt! Head on over to Decades of Style for this and a lot more fabulous patterns!

Laura x