1960s Dress (Simplicity 8591)

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I’m so excited to be kicking off June with a brand new vintage-inspired make. It’s been a little while since I last turned my hand to a reproduction vintage pattern (despite an ever increasing stash of these patterns in my sewing cupboard), so this make feels particularly overdue. I’ve had my mind on a version of Simplicity’s 8591 pattern for a while – it’s super fun and flirty, perfect for a floraly summer dress – but couldn’t settle on a fabric. Fortunately, a trip to Joann’s set me in good stead with a beautiful mint green cotton and I was determined to finish May with a new dress under my belt (so to speak). And here she is…

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Sweet and simple. I love this dress so much! I so rarely have any issue with Simplicity patterns and S8591 was no exception. Despite the incident with my serger (we’re only just on speaking terms again), there were really no hiccups with any part of the construction process. Everything came together a treat due Simplicity’s super clear instructions. For some reason, I always panic when I use patterns from major pattern companies (Vogue, McCalls etc.). I’m not sure why – perhaps its the massive instructions sheets that typically come with their patterns. Either way, I’m always incredible intimidated by them. But this fear is usually unwarranted, particularly when I’m working with anything from Simplicity. I really enjoyed the construction of this dress and was able to reinforce a few skills – gathering, making ruffles – along the way!

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Definitely feeling my oats here

Size-wise, I obviously didn’t make a muslin (regular readers of Sew For Victory know that I avoid muslins with a tenacity that would honestly be impressive were it applied constructively elsewhere). As usual, I simply followed the sizing as per my measurements and hoped for the best. In the end, I had to take the bodice in quite a bit. I think I probably could have left it as it was, in which case it would’ve had a pretty generous amount of ease and just looked a little baggy around the waist/bust. But, since I decided to use an invisible zip rather than the standard zipper required by the pattern, it was super easy to take in. I simply basted the zip in and then worked with it until I got the fit just right. Obviously having my mannequin helped a lot with this!

Honestly, though, this fit adjustment wasn’t even slightly challenging. I would probably suggest that anyone trying this pattern might want to make a muslin first (if that floats your boat and, if it doesn’t, welcome to the club!) or perhaps opt for an invisible zip. Working with an invisible zip isn’t problematic at all in this case – there’s a generous amount of allowance of either side of the back bodice, so it’s simply a matter of finding a good fit and inserting the zip as you would normally sew in an invisible zipper (basically, I just ignored the pattern instructions and did my own thing).

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Let’s talk about the sleeve (and ignore my super pink arm – English people shouldn’t be outside in St Louis summer weather). Oh my goodness, is it the cutest feature! When I first started putting the dress together, I was slightly worried that it was looking a bit Victorian. Paired with the very gathered skirt, it definitely has that sort of feel to it. But the length of the sleeves work perfectly with the ruffles and, once the belt is added and the dress is hemmed, the dress instantly takes itself out of the 1800s and into the 1960s.

I’m in love with these ruffles. They’re really easy to add on and, if you work with a medium-weight cotton, they stand out beautifully. I’m obsessed on so many levels and seriously considering adding ruffles to literally every sleeve that I make from now on.

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I also really like the belt. I wasn’t sure if I could be bothered making it – particularly because I knew that I would have to trawl the internet for an appropriate belt buckle. It was definitely a quest trying to find one without a prong that was also the right size and colour. Fortunately, I now know that Etsy is the place to be when it comes to vintage belt buckles. After a bit of searching, I struck gold with this 1930s buckle – perfectly sized and only $8.00. I’m so glad that I decided to make the effort – not least because the belt only took about 30 mins to construct and it really does add to the 1960s vibe of the whole ensemble.

It’s also worth mentioning that this dress works perfectly well without a petticoat. I do have a bit of a problem when it comes to 1950s/1960s silhouettes. I love a circle skirt but I find that, without a petticoat, they can end up making my hips look enormous. The whole thing ends up looking a bit like a deflating balloon. Fortunately, the gathering on this skirt – balanced out by the high neckline and ruffles on the sleeves – helps the dress look amazing, even without a petticoat. This definitely makes me much more likely to wear it out and about!

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What more can I say? This dress is a vintage lover’s dream. I think it may be one of favourite makes to date (I know, I say this every time – but seriously, it’s amazing). I’m thinking it would be perfect for special occasions but could totally see it working for a  summer picnic or a desire to pretend you’re starring opposite Gene Kelly in a Hollywood musical (not that I ever think about this).

Now I’m off to twirl around for a while and practice some seriously sub-par dance moves!

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It’s Lu-chee-ah!

I’ve finally calmed down after last week’s serger incident. Clementine and I are back on speaking terms and I’ve actually managed to finish my version of S8591, with no further attempts at sabotage! I was able to find a piece of fabric remnant in the bin large enough to cut out another ruffle for my sleeve so the whole project was salvaged. Hurrah! I’m beyond pleased about this because, honestly, this dress may be one of the prettiest I’ve made so far. Here’s a little sneaky peek for all of you Keen Katies (I don’t know if this is a thing, but we’ll go with it):

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Ok so it’s not much of a sneak shot but I don’t want to give too much away before I post the full photos next week. But, at the very least, you can see this beautiful fabric! I’m in love with it! I kind of picked it up on a whim – not particularly in love with it, but otherwise feeling that it would work well for the pattern. Also, it’s mint green which seems to have become a wardrobe staple of mine without me even realising it. However, once the pattern started coming together I could see how perfectly the fabric works. The dress is super flouncy and cute – the fabric definitely serves to really bring these characteristics out and adds wonderfully to the floral, summer vibe that I was shooting for!

So, yes, pretty pretty prettiness is on its way to you next week! In the meantime, I thought I’d do another project update – because, seriously, I’m whizzing through these patterns like nobody’s business right now. As predicted, my next pattern has not ended up being the Sew Over It Poppy Playsuit – although, it is a different Sew Over It pattern! I’ve decided to turn my hand to making a couple of versions of the new Lucia Top! Since I’m a member of the Sew Over It PDF Club (so exclusive, I know!), I actually got an email about this pattern a few days before it was released. I knew immediately that I wanted to make it – although I didn’t jump on it fast enough to get the discount that came with the email. Still, I’m super excited for this pattern and having even more ruffles in my life!

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I think that I mentioned in a previous post that I’ve been wanting to make more separates. Taking part in Me Made May has definitely shown me how woefully lacking I am in this department. I have lots of bottoms – trousers, skirts – but only one top (and since it’s very floral and sheer, it’s not particularly versatile). So one of my goals for the coming months is to spend a bit more time filling in the gaps. This isn’t an easy task for me. I started sewing largely because I wanted to make lovely vintage clothes, and I will always be most drawn to beautiful vintage patterns. However, there’s a definite discrepancy between my everyday wardrobe and the things I make. I’m not a pin-up model and I don’t live in vintage clothes. I love them and I love to wear them, but it’s also not feasible for me to be walking the dog in 35C weather or doing yoga in a 1950s dress.

At the start of the year, I actually set out one of my sewing objectives as finding more of a balance between everyday and vintage patterns. I think I’ve mostly achieved this – what with the Ultimate Trousers and the Ginger Jeans. But, honestly, I find the idea of sewing tops really boring. So I’ve never wanted to invest any time in it. That said, I’m keen to really fill out my wardrobe and I figure that the nice thing about tops is their relative lack of time investment! I’ve already cut out the Lucia pattern and it’s only 3 pattern pieces. That’s definitely refreshing! Since I’m committed to making some versatile wardrobe staples, I’ve also decided to make my initial versions in just plain knit fabrics – one black and one white. I think these will work really well with the skirts and trousers that I’ve already made – plus, I can always make more exciting versions in the future!

So that’s my sewing life at the moment. I’ll definitely have some new bits and pieces to show you next week! In the meantime, if you missed it, you can check out my last post Sewing For Self-Care: A Round-Up to check out what’s been happening on the blog over the past few months!

 

 

Enemy No. 1: Laura’s Serger

If you read last week’s project update post, you’ll know that I’m working on a new super cute vintage dress. I’m pretty obsessed with the pattern and the fabric is definitely a summer dream – so, needless to say, I got to work on it almost as soon as my Vintage Shirt Dress was finished up! So far, the construction process has been pretty amazing. I sometimes have problems following patterns from the bigger companies, mostly because they usually seem to assume a certain level of pre-existing knowledge about the pattern. Although I definitely think I’m past the point of being a beginner to sewing, I still appreciate a beginner’s approach to pattern instructions – an approach that I generally find it pretty typical with the various indie companies I’ve used.

That said, Simplicity is usually pretty good at giving enough instruction to avoid substantial problems and S8591 has been quite true to this trend so far. So, unusually, this mid-construction update post is not an opportunity to get frustrated with complicated instructions. Instead, I’m going to rant about my new ENEMY NUMBER 1 – Constantine the Serger.

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Although we’ve had our run-ins on a fairly regular basis (usually when he refuses to create a proper chain after my fifth rethreading), we’ve always found a way to work through our issues. In fact, I have always pretty well raved about him at any given opportunity. Serged edges look so professional and overlocking them has removed virtually all of my anxiety over washing my me-made garments for fear of fraying. I totally recommend a serger to anyone who is looking to take their sewing to the next level. They’re a pain to learn to thread for sure, but they’re definitely a worthwhile investment. This is not a statement that remains specific to my serger, however. He’s turned on me.

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The ironic thing with this incident is that I wasn’t even serging anywhere near the sleeve ruffle. The sleeves had been done and dusted for a while by this point – and that’s what makes this even harder to accept. I was serging the back seams and *somehow*, right at the end of the back seam, the sleeve just up and practically walked itself under the knife and needles. I genuinely have no idea how it happened. In fact, I am ridiculously careful anytime I have anything to do with cutting or finishing seams – largely because of the incident last year where I accidentally cut a massive hole in the back of my wedding dress muslin whilst trimming seams.

So there is no conclusion possible other than my certainty that Constantine the Serger is determined to destroy my projects and, ultimately, my life. If I never post again, you can assume he’s taken his quest for vengeance to its inevitable conclusion. But if I survive, you’ll find me digging for fabric remnants in the bin, in the hopes that I’ll find a piece large enough for a brand new ruffle! Keep your fingers crossed for me!

 

New Projects: Foxy Cotton and 1960s Ruffles

Starting off this post with a big thank you for the response to my Ginger Jeans! I’m definitely super pleased with how they turned out. And, seriously, if you think jeans are beyond your reach, I promise you they aren’t. You’ll just have to trust me and give the Ginger Jeans a go!

With the Ginger Jeans ticked off my list and my Sew Over It Vintage Shirt Dress all finished (photos to come soon and boy is this dress a stunner!), I’m turning my mind to some new projects. I’ve had my eye on a couple of patterns for a while and, with summer now fully here in St Louis, it’s time to get sewing a few more heat-appropriate outfits! So let’s take a look at what I’ll be working on…

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S8591 is a pattern that I’ve been lusting after for some time. I’m often found perusing the vintage section of Simplicity’s website when I have an overwhelming desire to sew something vintage-inspired. Fortunately, on one of my frequent trips to Joann’s, I came across the pattern in one of their pattern sales! I can’t remember how much I ended up paying, but I think it was 50% off. Bargain! Obviously, after finding the pattern, I had to uncover the perfect fabric. As soon as I saw this cotton, I knew it was the one! Mint green is my favourite. Plus there are gold butterflies! I mean, really, what could be better? Another outfit that will match my favourite mint green petticoat and shoes (are you sensing a theme?)!

I’ve already started work on S8591 (hence the crumpled pattern sleeve!). Fingers crossed that it’ll be an easy breezy construction process and I’ll wind up with a perfect summer dress!

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The second project I have in mind is the Sew Over It Poppy Playsuit, using this gorgeous floral crepe. I’ve wanted to sew a playsuit for ages. I actually own one that I bought from Modcloth ages ago but the fit isn’t great. Which is a shame because it’s super cute and covered in an umbrella pattern. I mean, it’s fine and comfortable as long as my arms are down by my side. But as soon as I raise them, it gets super uncomfortable in the crotchal region. I figure sewing my own playsuit will probably give me the best chance of actually owning something that fits properly. I’m planning on making the version with the shorter legs because SUMMER!

Right now, the plan is to work on the jumpsuit after I finish S8591. However, we all know that I have a propensity to get wildly off track when it comes to my sewing plans. I get distracted by shiny new patterns and fabric. So, while I’m sure the playsuit will happen (probably this year), it’s anyone’s guess whether it will get sewn any time in the near future!

My final project isn’t really a project. It’s another AMAZING fabric for which I have some vague ideas…

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Let’s just take a moment to appreciate the pure sweetness of this fabric. I found this in one of my favourite local fabric stores. I don’t shop there much since we moved to the city – also, they don’t really do sales or discounts so all of their fabric is on the pricey side. That said, I totally couldn’t resist this cotton. It’s actually – totally incidentally – designed by Dear Stella Designs, who also created my favourite Parisian fabric! Clearly they have a knack for making incredibly cute cottons.

Anyway, my plans for this fabric are to make a summer skirt – probably on the longer side (just past the knees/mid-calf, I’m thinking) with some pleats for shape. The main issue is that the fabric doesn’t have a lot of width to it. I think it’s about 43″ wide and I have roughly 4 yds (I bought it a while ago, so my memory is evaporating – it could be 3.5 yds). I like the skirt version of Sew Over It’s Rosie Dress (and it has an option for fabric that’s 1.15m wide) but I do prefer the skirt of the Elsie Dress (which doesn’t have a 1.15m option). So I’m a bit stumped on what to do. If you have any pattern ideas that fit the bill and maybe look a little more pleated – like the skirt of the Elsie dress – definitely leave me a comment! I really don’t want to use the fabric on a pattern that I’m not hugely enthusiastic about since (1) it was expensive, and (2) I really like it!

Those are all of my current project updates! I’m also in the process of putting together a list of patterns that I want to get through this year. There are about 15 items so it’s definitely overly-ambitious. But participating in Me Made May has shown me that my wardrobe is dramatically lacking in separates (I have literally no tops). So my goal is to start spending more time on ‘small’ projects – where I can, perhaps, make multiple versions of a pattern to fill my every day wardrobe. Ideally, I’d like to get to a place where I can put together a good number of self-made outfits (not counting dresses) and mix-and-match what I have. So wish me luck!

I’ll be back next week with some pics of my new Sew Over It Vintage Shirt Dress and the usual does of Laura’s internal ramblings. In the meantime, have an amazing weekend!